F14_electives_HGLT

FALL 2014 ELECTIVES

Please see here the list of courses available for next semester:

FALL 2014.

ARCH4020/CIVIL4020 Bedford Seminar: Advanced Building Structures (Civil)

This interdisciplinary seminar consists of students from both the School of Architecture and Civil Engineering department. Presentation of a variety of structural typologies bears direct relation to practical experience and the necessity for constructive interdisciplinary discourse. Specific structural typologies are examined through historic and contemporary project examples that are critically deconstructed and critically analyzed with respect to their basic engineering principles and architectural concepts. Students will be exposed to the collaborative methods inherent within the architect/engineer relationship. The course consists of lectures concerning each topic, case studies and presentations of relevant projects, an interdisciplinary design project and discussion of the projects and presentations with respect to interdisciplinary discourse. Content and delivery may vary by instructor.  Staff. R 6-8:50 pm. Cr. 3. Taught with CIVL4020. Prerequisite: Arch2230 Structures 1.

ARCH4170.80 Environmental Parametrics

The work of this course sets out to describe the meaning, values, and methods of using parametric techniques as both an analytical tool and a generative device in comprehensive performance-based building design. The students learn techniques to set-up feedback between analysis and tactical response in performance-based design while also situating these techniques within the broader discourse and methodology of fostering design ecologies and creating ecologies of design as they relate to the construction of the built environment and contemporary issues of sustainability. Taught at CASE NYC.

ARCH4750 Sustainable Building Design Metrics

A review of current and anticipated metrics associated with sustainable building design will be reviewed as well as construction practices in the building industry will be discussed.  We will review how sustainable design practice can mitigate the climate change in a positive way. An understanding of energy terminology is useful for this course. Lectures, discussions, field trips and assigned reading will be utilized to explore the subject matter. Oliver Holmes. M 6 – 9 pm. Cr. 2

ARCH4840 Architectural Acoustics 1

Providing an overview of the essentials for architectural acoustics design of performance and public spaces, including concert halls, theaters, museums, classrooms, sports arenas, courtrooms, and religious buildings. The course may be used as a concentration in an architecture student’s professional electives, or the beginning of a master’s degree in acoustics. Covering basic principles of sound, room acoustics, sound absorption in rooms, sound isolation and privacy, acoustics of mechanical systems, and sound quality.  After Architecture Acoustics 1 & 2, students should be prepared for a basic entry-level position in either acoustics in architecture, or in acoustical consulting.  Todd Brooks  F 10–11:50, F 12–1:50 pm. Cr 4. (can be used towards a minor in Acoustics).

ARCH4960 Bioclimatic Design

How did people create thermally comfortable, and even thermally delightful, dwellings in the generations before mechanical heating and cooling became common?   And how can contemporary buildings benefit from the precedents they set?  With only the earth, plants, sun, wind, and water immediately available, people have devised ingenious, expressive, and thought-provoking solutions to the persistent challenge of creating shelter.   This course will explore these solutions in depth, considering their formal, spatial, and material aspects as well as their applicability to current design.  Alexandra Rempel.  Cr 2. M 10 – 12.

 ARCH4961.01 Duchamp Seminar: Anarchism Umped

Explore the life, work and influence of Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968), inventor of the readymade and father of conceptual art. By examining his ideas and those of his peers we will critically map his influence on 20th century art and architecture. Speculated as “the world’s first feminist artist” by curator Helen Molesworth, Duchamp continues to impact art discourse, 44 years after his death. Readings, response papers, field trips (to the Philadelphia Museum of Art) and discussions with two of the world’s leading Duchamp authorities, Francis Naumann and Michael Taylor. Michael Oatman. W 10–11:50 am. Cr 2.

ARCH4964.01 Sensory Culture

This seminar examines human perception from a designer’s perspective. It draws on perspectives from the sciences, arts, and humanities in order to build an understanding of how we perceive and interact with the environments we create. One can not only read about perception, the seminar will augment reading with a range of direct experiences as source material for discussion.  Ted Krueger. W. 10-12. Cr. 2

ARCH4967 Robotic Material Assemblies

This course is an advanced design seminar that explores the use of robotic gantry for direct material assembly. The primary objective is to understand all the different processes involved in the emerging 3D/4D printing technologies, from modifying the material properties to writing motion control code that directs the assembly process. The first component of the course will be to teach students how to write custom g-code to control a 3-axis motion gantry, pneumatic injector, and temperature controller. This part will require students to have prior knowledge of Rhino 3D and Rhino Grasshopper. The second component will be to learn to modify the material properties. Ted Ngai. W 12-2. Cr.2

ARCH4968 Architecture in the time of Synthetic Biology

Grounded within contemporary discourse regarding the future of our planet, the seminar will try to compare the process of natural evolution and exponential expansion of human technologies.  We are living in an era during which the differences between the natural and the artificial and between a living and non-living are beginning to blur.  Natural evolution shifts to technological evolution which is occurring in exponential speediness.  For the first time, since billions of years, living systems are born in artificial, laboratory conditions. Their development is determined not by natural but artificial selection.  They are natural and synthetic at the same time.  What implications for our life and for architecture will these changes have?  Zbigniew Oksiuta.  Cr  2. R 10 – 12.

ARCH6120 Design Explorations 2
ARCH6120.80 Design Explorations 2 CASE
ARCH6120.81  Design Explorations 2 CASE
ARCH6130 Design Explorations 3 (meets wARCH6120)

ARCH6310.80 Environmental History & Theory

This course has been conceived in tandem with the Integrative Materials Course and with Built Ecologies Design Research Studio, such that each student will develop a complementary written analysis that critically situates the new material system that the student is developing in design studio within historical, socio-political and economic flows. The written analysis will directly reference key themes contained within the required readings, lectures, and seminar discussions. Anna Dyson. Cr 3. (Taught at CASE in NYC).

ARCH6340.80 Material Systems and Productions

This seminar will investigate emerging functional materials addressing physical adaptability to environmental and climatic fluctuations. Bio-climatic responsiveness via multi-scale intelligence will be examined from innovations on material simulation systems, low energy/low waste manufacturing, raw material reduction and material reduction and material consumption reduction within potential design applications. Design exercises will develop building systems or products that reduce material use, weight, volume or energy consumption with the goal of increasing the environmental performance of the system. Jason Vollen.  Cr 3. (Taught at CASE in NYC w/4960)

ARCH6370.80 Environmental Parametrics Workshop MAII

This course is an intensive workshop that exposes the students at the Center for Architectural Science and Ecology to the computational platforms and parametric techniques that will be used in the analysis and visualization of building and urban scale bioclimactic flows in addition to the whole-building energy matrix. Furthermore, the course uses project-based exercises to expose the broad issues of ecological thinking in built ecologies such as multiple variable trade-off optimization of systems and morphological and tectonic optimization. This course meets in the Fall and is offered to M.Arch 2 students attending the Center for Architectural Science + Ecology (CASE) Post-Professional (M.Arch2) Environmental Parametrics Program.  2 Credits

ARCH6380.80 Graduate Environmental Parametrics M.Arch 1

The work of this course sets out to describe the meaning, values, and methods of using parametric techniques as both an analytical tool and a generative device in comprehensive performance-based building design.  The students learn techniques to set-up feedback between analysis and tactical response in performance-based design while also situating these techniques within the broader discourse and methodology of fostering design ecologies and creating ecologies of design as they relate to the construction of the built environment and contemporary issues of sustainability. In addition to the practical concerns of environmental parametrics, this course will examine closely the theoretical foundation for environmental parametrics. CASE NYC.

LGHT4230 Lighting Design

A design studio that explores the roles of light in architecture and its application by design. Students conceive, evaluate, and synthesize solutions that contribute to successful lighting and architectural design. Russ Leslie. TF 2–4:50 pm. Cr 4. (Recommended for 4th and 5th year architecture undergraduate students – also can be used towards a minor in Lighting).

LGHT4840 Human Factors in Lighting

An introduction to lighting and human factors, including classical literature and contemporary studies and development of skills needed to conduct and evaluate human factors research. Fall term annually. Mariana Figueiro. MR 10–11:50 am. Cr 4. (Recommended for 4th and 5th year architecture undergraduate students – also can be used towards a minor in Lighting).

LGHT6830 Physics of Light

A comprehensive overview of the physics of light and its applications for lighting. The course uses a variety of instructional methodologies, including lectures, laboratory sessions, hands-on experimentation, and individual student projects and presentations to cover various areas of lighting study. Topics include geometric optics, physical optics, lighting calculations and measures, spectroradiometry, measurement techniques for advanced light sources, radiometry, and photometry. Nadarajh Narendran. TF 10-11:50 am. Cr 4. (Undergraduates must receive permission of instructor). 3/26/2014 9:38 AM

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Evan Douglis, Professor

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