Portfolio Work Samples

Reference:

Undergraduate Portfolio Work Samples

The following images are examples of students work submitted in the past to our undergraduate program.

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Jenna Kulek. "Self Portrait". Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 8" x 8".

To make my self-portrait interesting, I used heavy lighting to create an emphasis on half of my face.

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Jenna Kulek. "Boxes". Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 16" x 16".

The focus of this piece was understanding perspective by focusing on subjects that are simple in shape.

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Jenna Kulek. "Cups and Grapes". Medium: colored pencil. Dimensions: 6" x 8"

This piece explores the way objects connect with each other through their reflections.

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Jenna Kulek. "Dakota Building." Medium: photograph. Dimensions: 14" x 10".

This photograph is an interesting composition because of all of the different angles and directions of lines.

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Taylor Carlin. "Reconstruction." Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 18" x 24".

Reconstruction can be seen as a renewal or a rebirth of something. My high school has recently been going through reconstruction and to show that the dramatic changes happening now will one day blossom into something better and beautiful like a flower.

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Taylor Carlin. "Secrets." Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 15" x 16.5"

The concept of this piece is being caught in the act or the lie of keeping secrets. The fish hook represents the girl getting caught like a fish in the act of her secret and the light reveals the truth hidden in the dark.

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Taylor Carlin. "Rose Hat". Medium: graphite pencil. Dimensions: 12" x 18".

This artwork is meant to realistically portray a still life but transform it in an interesting way. So I made the ribbon on the hat wrap around its stand and flow into a soft rose.

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Taylor Carlin. "Sleeping Baby". Medium: acrylic paint, pen. Dimensions: 10" x 7.5"

The point of this piece was to concentrate on the background first before the foreground and to make it look interesting. I used am mixture of warm colors and figure painted the background into swirls. Then, I drew the baby in pen, letting the background shine through the foreground.

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Taylor Carlin. "Apple Black and White". Medium: graphite pencil. Dimensions: 9" x 11.5".

This is the still life in pencil before it was done in acrylic paint. The shadowing and highlights capture the texture and reflections of the fruit.

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Taylor Carlin. "Childhood Dreams". Medium: charcoal, chalk. Dimensions: 24" x 18"

This piece was dedicated to one of my good friends who is really a child at heart. This is demonstrated by the fun purple background and her cuddling with a unicorn stuffed animal. I also tried to make it fun by making bubbles come out of the unicorn's horn like a bubble wand.

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Taylor Carlin. "Self Image". Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 24" x 18".

This self portrait was done using a dramatic light for effect. The light blurs out some features and makes something left in the dark. It also creates extreme highlights and shadows on the face.

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Elizabeth Lee. "Favia". Medium: plaster. Dimensions: 18"x18"x17.5"

I began by chiseling the form to break it away from the initial shape left from the bag. Next, I drilled a hole, which was a bit larger than expected, but I continued chiseling. Then it began to form into a bulbous curling shape at the base and two nautical looking masses expanding outward from the center. The two nautical masses have multiple holes drilled into them, balancing the large pass-through near the center. The undulating holes were cut on one side to echo the curling bulb at the base. For the surface texture, I created indentations, slightly in resemblance to the spine of leaves, echoing the contour of the undulating holes and following through to the curling base seeming as though it is being constrained within the center. The tubular mass at the top does the opposite, expanding outward, reducing the amount of tension the farther away it gets from the center, seeming as though to branch off of the other mass.

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Elizabeth Lee. "Internal Evolution". Medium: Paper Sculpture. Dimensions: 21" x 16" x 9"

When you first look at my piece you recognize a resemblance of a spiraling upward motion like the start of a double helix. The double-helix is the model of DNA, the backbone of each individual’s genetic make-up. The steps represent the different stages that impact one’s life. DNA makes up the color of your eyes, hair, and skin. It determines your physical attributes. However, it’s the experiences in life that make you an individual, that make you who you are. The small triangle evolves over time as it reaches and climbs one step or obstacle at a time becoming larger and larger, reaching to the top of the staircase, where rests, a new and improved pyramid, still having the same basic essential characteristics of the original pyramid but unique, representing ones growth as an individual, yet stronger and more stable, more capable of withstanding the pressures and stresses of life.

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Elizabeth Lee. "Dance Backdrop Design". Medium: Cut Black Paper on Yellow Ground. Dimensions: 8.5" x 11"

The objective of this piece was to design a backdrop for some Modern Dancers. I went and listened to music for the dance performance and based on the sounds of the music I tried to create an angular fairly fast paced geometric backdrop to echo some of the movements of the dancers.

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Elizabeth Lee. "The Female Nude". Medium: Acrylic on Canvas. Dimensions: 18" x 24"

In this piece I worked with the female nude as subject matter for my first painting. I used the gesture of the figure to break up the space and create an interesting contour from an angle that somewhat abstracts the human form.

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Elizabeth Lee. "Organic Diptych". Medium: Photography. Dimensions: 17.5" x 22.5"

In this project I tried to find an interesting angle of organic forms and how they can correlate through orientation.

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August Rulewich. Medium: charcoal. Dim: 23 5/8" x 16 7/8"

A portrait of the architect Louis Kahn. Though this drawing was a copy of a photograph (which was that particular assignment), it was one of my first with charcoal. It represents my first steps towards my love for the medium, and allowed me to witness how much could be achieved with charcoal.

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August Runewich. Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 18" x 22 7/8".    

We did a few of these longer, seated poses in AP Drawing, where we had about 20-30 minutes per pose. Charcoal helped greatly with the faster renderings.

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August Runewich. Medium: ceramics. Dimensions: 4 1/2" x 3" x 3 1/4"; 3 1/2" x 3" x 3 1/2"; 5 3/4" x 1 1/4" x 5 3/4"

These two cups and the small dish were also created with my aunt. They were some of my first full constructions on the wheel without assistance.

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August Rulewich. Medium: ceramics. Dimensions: 3 1/4" x 4 3/4" x 3 1/4"; 3" x 4 1/4" x 3"; 2 1/2" x 3" x 2 1/2"

These three pots were created one summer with my aunt. These were my first real constructions with clay that were not done on a wheel.

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Jennifer Lema (2011). "Aunt's Forks." Medium: sanguine on paper. Dimensions: 14”x17”.  

Observation drawing.

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Jennifer Lema (2011). Chair Design. Medium: wood. Dimensions: 8”x20”x23”.

Architecture class project that was inspired by Verner Panton's "Panton Chair".

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Amanda Alexander. "Pineapple Structure". Medium: ebony pencil on paper. Dimensions: 8.5" x 11"

Assignment - The first step to discovering the structure of a pineapple was to draw it in detail.

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Amanda Alexander. "Gazing". Medium: oil pastel on paper. Dimensions: 18" x 24"

Assignment - Figure drawing of a female model

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Amanda Alexander. "Pathway". Medium: recycled picture frames on two-by-fours. Dimensions: 5' x 4.5' x 7"

I used various lengths and widths of picture frames to form triangular pieces that will shape a pathway in the sculpture garden at school. This project is still in progress and at the end; I will have a total of eight triangular pieces like this one.

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Amanda Alexander. "Write To The Top". Medium: #2 pencils. Dimensions: 2' x 2.5' x 4'

Used 115 fifteen #2 pencils to create a stable and complex sculpture reaching four feet high.

Jenna Kulek. "Self Portrait". Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 8" x 8".Jenna Kulek. "Boxes". Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 16" x 16".Jenna Kulek. "Cups and Grapes". Medium: colored pencil. Dimensions: 6" x 8"Jenna Kulek. "Dakota Building." Medium: photograph. Dimensions: 14" x 10".Taylor Carlin. "Reconstruction." Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 18" x 24".Taylor Carlin. "Secrets." Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 15" x 16.5"Taylor Carlin. "Rose Hat". Medium: graphite pencil. Dimensions: 12" x 18".Taylor Carlin. "Sleeping Baby". Medium: acrylic paint, pen. Dimensions: 10" x 7.5"Taylor Carlin. "Apple Black and White". Medium: graphite pencil. Dimensions: 9" x 11.5".Taylor Carlin. "Childhood Dreams". Medium: charcoal, chalk. Dimensions: 24" x 18"Taylor Carlin. "Self Image". Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 24" x 18".Elizabeth Lee. "Favia". Medium: plaster. Dimensions: 18"x18"x17.5"Elizabeth Lee. "Internal Evolution". Medium: Paper Sculpture. Dimensions: 21" x 16" x 9"Elizabeth Lee. "Dance Backdrop Design". Medium: Cut Black Paper on Yellow Ground. Dimensions: 8.5" x 11"Elizabeth Lee. "The Female Nude". Medium: Acrylic on Canvas. Dimensions: 18" x 24"Elizabeth Lee. "Organic Diptych". Medium: Photography. Dimensions: 17.5" x 22.5"August Rulewich. Medium: charcoal. Dim: 23 5/8" x 16 7/8"August Runewich. Medium: charcoal. Dimensions: 18" x 22 7/8".
   August Runewich. Medium: ceramics. Dimensions: 4 1/2" x 3" x 3 1/4"; 3 1/2" x 3" x 3 1/2"; 5 3/4" x 1 1/4" x 5 3/4"August Rulewich. Medium: ceramics. Dimensions: 3 1/4" x 4 3/4" x 3 1/4"; 3" x 4 1/4" x 3"; 2 1/2" x 3" x 2 1/2"Jennifer Lema (2011). "Aunt's Forks." Medium: sanguine on paper. Dimensions: 14”x17”.
 Jennifer Lema (2011). Chair Design. Medium: wood. Dimensions: 8”x20”x23”.Amanda Alexander. "Pineapple Structure". Medium: ebony pencil on paper. Dimensions: 8.5" x 11"Amanda Alexander. "Gazing". Medium: oil pastel on paper. Dimensions: 18" x 24"Amanda Alexander. "Pathway". Medium: recycled picture frames on two-by-fours. Dimensions: 5' x 4.5' x 7"Amanda Alexander. "Write To The Top". Medium: #2 pencils. Dimensions: 2' x 2.5' x 4'

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